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Hazardous waste - consignment notes

Changes to the assessment and consignment of hazardous waste

Contents

Introduction

We have tried to review the Environment Agencies guide on hazardous waste disposal Guidance HWR03 Consignment Notes which can be found by following the link: http://publications.environment-agency.gov.uk/PDF/GEHO0311BTPW-E-E.pdf. We have had to read it several times and it still does not make sense!  

Changes

1. A new important requirement is that anyone who produces handles or manages hazardous waste must take all reasonable measures apply the waste hierarchy when they transfer waste. Unless there is a justifiable reason not to, a waste should be managed in order of preference by:

  • Prevention;
  • Preparing for re-use;
  • Recycling;
  • Other recovery (for example energy recovery);
  • Disposal.

The consignment note now includes a declaration in Part D (of the form) for you to indicate that you have considered the hierarchy before transferring your waste. Adopting best practice advised for your sector will help you achieve the aims of the waste hierarchy.

2. A new hazard code has been introduced, H13 (sensitizing) and the previous H13 has now become H15 (waste capable by any means after disposal of yielding another substance e.g. a leachate which possess any of H1 to H14 hazardous properties). You (the company) will now need to assess your wastes using the new hazardous property and include the new codes on your consignment note as appropriate in Part B (of the form)

3. The consignment note has been changed to be used for both standard and multiple collections. (For Carriers) If you are a carrier and operate a multiple collection round, you will need to include a round number and the number of collection sites on the consignment note.

4. You must use the new consignment note from Autumn 2011.

Sections

The Environmental Guidance is split into six sections (A-F) and include the following:

  • Section A: Standard Consignment Note Procedure
  • Section B: Multiple collections
  • Section C: Pipelines and ships
  • Section D: Cross-border movements
  • Section E: Schedule of carriers
  • Section F – Rejected loads

The following sections will be examined in more detail:

  • Section A: Standard Consignment Note Procedure
  • Section F – Rejected loads

Definitions

There are five main definitions used:

  • A “Carrier” is a person who collects or carries waste. A carrier must be registered with the Environment Agency or Scottish Environmental Protection Agency unless they are exempt (in other words, excused) from doing so.
  • A “Consignee” is a person who receives waste to recover or dispose
  • A “Producer” is a person who produces waste (this will be the case for most companies).  A producer must hold a hazardous waste registration unless they are exempt from doing so.
  • A “Holder” is a person who holds waste that was not originally produced by them. A holder must hold a hazardous waste registration unless they are exempt from doing so.
  • A “Consignor” is a person who causes waste to be removed from a site. This is usually the holder or producer. In some cases (for example, when a managing agent is on site and has authority from the producer or holder), this can be the consignor. A carrier is not usually a consignor.

 

hen don’t I need to use a consignment note?

A consignment note is not required for

  • Radioactive Waste (note smoke detectors are included in this guidance)
  • Domestic hazardous waste
  • Waste waters
  • Any premises identified in a Regulatory Position Statement of premises notification

 

What do consignment notes look like?

The format for consignment notes is shown in schedule 4 to the Hazardous Waste Regulations (HWR). Any consignment note you use must contain the same information as that given in the regulations. The Environment Agency have produced a template for consignment notes that keeps to the regulations. An example can be found at http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/static/documents/Business/HWCN01v111_paper_final_April_2011.pdf

 

Section A Consignment Note Standard Procedure

If you are the producer, holder or consignor of hazardous waste you must ensure that a consignment note is completed when the waste is moved. A consignment note acts as a paper or electronic receipt for movements of hazardous waste. The following needs to be considered:

  • when you might not need consignment notes;
  • where to get consignment notes, if you do need them;
  • how to fill in consignment notes;
  • all about consignment note codes;
  • who fills in the different parts of the note;
  • why there are three sheets to each consignment note and who has each copy.

 

How do I fill in a consignment note?

(Guidance on filling a consignment note is given by the Environment Agency.)

Before the hazardous waste is collected from your site, you need to start filling in the top sheet (the ‘Producer’s/Consignor’s/Holder’s Copy’) of the consignment note. As you write on the top sheet, the information will be copied to the sheets below.

Each of the consignment note copies is divided into five sections, parts A to E.

 

Part A Notification details (producer/ holder responsibility)

The producer or holder of the waste should fill in this section.

1. ‘Consignment note code’

  • The Environment Agency set the format of the consignment note code. Companies must follow this format; otherwise the consignment note will not be valid.
  • The consignment note code must be unique. If you use a code for one load, you must not use that number again for another.
  • The consignment note code depends on whether your site is exempt from registration or needs to be registered.
  • For more information on this top read HWR02A – ‘Do I need to notify my premises?’ if a company is not sure.

2. ‘The waste described below is to be removed from (name, address, postcode, telephone, email, facsimile):’

  • These are the details of the place the hazardous waste is being removed from.
  • If the premises are registered, the name, address and postcode on the form must match the details given to us when the site was registered.
  • If the site is exempt from registration, the details must fully describe the place the waste is being removed from.
  • A postcode is required for the consignment to be properly completed. If the site does not have a postcode, it must give the nearest known full postcode to the site.
  • If the site has a phone number, e-mail address or fax number, enter these details too.

3. ‘Premises code (where applicable):’

  • If the premises are registered with the Environment Agency then you should enter the premises code in the Premises Code. This is the registration number the Environment Agency gave the premises when they it was registered. If the premises are exempt from registration, write ‘N/A’ or ‘Exempt’ here.

4. ‘The waste will be taken to (name, address & postcode):’

  • This provides details about the site the hazardous waste is going to be delivered to (that is, the consignee). The site must provide full details of the consignee, and any consignee they choose to send waste to must either hold a permit to receive the waste or be exempt from holding a waste permit. The company are responsible for making sure this is the case. If the consignee holds a waste permit, the name, address and postcode you give on the form should match the name, address and postcode on the consignee’s permit.

5. ‘The waste producer was (if different from 2) (name, address, postcode, telephone, e-mail, facsimile):’

  • If the waste producer’s details are the same as those in part A2, you can write ‘As A2’ here. If the producer is different, you must give the producer’s details. For example, if the waste is asbestos and a contractor produced it at your facility, you need to identify the asbestos contractor as the waste producer and enter their business address.

 

Part B Description of the waste (producer/ holder responsibility)

The producer or holder of the waste should fill in this section.

You (the company/ site) need to fill in part B for each type of hazardous waste that is being collected and should use continuation sheets if necessary.

1. ‘The process giving rise to the waste(s) was:’

  • You should provide a full written description of the process that created the waste. It is not enough to just enter ‘Manufacturing’. If you are moving more than one type of hazardous waste which has been produced by more than one process, you should describe the main production process involved in creating the waste.

2. ‘SIC for the process giving rise to the waste:’

  • The SIC (or Standard Industrial Classification) is a coding scheme that classifies businesses and other economic activities.
  • You must provide the most detailed SIC code from the 2003 version of the scheme for the main activity that produced (or holds) the waste.
  • The SIC you give on the consignment note is not necessarily the code you were given at the time you registered the premises, but is the code used for the actual process that created the hazardous waste described on the note.
  • If you are moving more than one type of waste which has been produced by more than one process, you should give the SIC for the main production process involved in creating the waste.
  • For more details on the SIC 2003 code, see http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/business/topics/waste/32198.aspx

‘WASTE DETAILS’

You must fill in all of the following for each type of hazardous waste you are having collected

‘Description of waste’

  • You need to provide a written description of every type of hazardous waste you are having collected.
  • The description must not simply reproduce the description from the List of Waste Regulations (LoWR), which is the catalogue of all types of waste. You must provide a full description. For example, it is not enough to describe a waste acid from a pickling process as ‘pickling acids’ (the description in the LoWR for code 11 01 05). You should instead write something like ‘sulphuric acid used for pickling’.
  • You must not write ‘Laboratory chemicals’ as a type of waste. Instead, you must separately identify each chemical in the hazardous waste.
  • If you do not have enough space to record all of the details on one row of the table, use both rows. You can use continuation sheets for other types of hazardous waste you are having collected.
  • ‘List of Wastes (EWC) code (6 digits):’
  • You should choose an appropriate EWC code for each type of hazardous waste. The code should match the description of the waste and the business or process that produced it. You can get help on choosing an EWC code from our guide ‘WM2 - Interpretation of the definition and classification of hazardous waste’, which you can find at: www.environment-agency.gov.uk/static/documents/GEHO0603BIRB-e-e.pdf
  • ‘Quantity (kg):’
  • You must give the quantity (total weight), in kilograms, of each type of hazardous waste that has an EWC code. This should be the total weight of the waste the carrier is actually collecting. If the hazardous waste is a liquid, you can show the weight in kilograms by using a suitable method to convert the volume of the liquid to its equivalent weight. If you do not have a suitable method for doing this, convert one litre into one kilogram.
  • ‘The chemical/biological components of the waste and their concentrations are:’
  • You should give details of all the relevant chemical or biological parts (components)of the waste and their concentrations so that carriers, consignees or other people can see what is in each type of hazardous waste. This will also include parts of the waste that do not make it hazardous (for example, metals such as iron in pickling acids). Properly describing all the components of the waste is important in choosing how to dispose of the waste.
  • ‘Physical form (gas, liquid, solid, powder, sludge or mixed)’
  • You should write either ‘Gas’, ‘Liquid’, ‘Solid’, ‘Powder’, ‘Sludge’ or ‘Mixed’ for each type of waste that has an EWC code.
  • ‘Hazard code(s)’
  • You must give this information for all of the hazards appropriate to each hazardous waste. The hazardous properties are set out in Section A . You must provide the correct hazards for each type of the waste – it is not enough to put ‘H1 to H15’.
  • ‘Container type, number and size’
  • You must give the number and size of each container of hazardous waste (for example, ‘4 x 45 gallon drums’, ‘1 x 14 cubic yard skip’).
  • ‘UN identification number(s)’, ‘Proper shipping name(s)’, ‘UN Class(es)’, ‘Packing group(s)’ and ‘Special handling requirements’
  • You need to fill in these sections if the hazardous waste is also ‘dangerous for carriage’. See page 10 for more details.

 

Part C Carrier’s certificate (carrier’s responsibilities)

Once the site (You) have filled in parts A and B and the carrier now comes to collect the hazardous waste. Hand over the consignment notes to the carrier.

The carrier will fill in part C. They will check that the following information is correct:

  • The name and address of your site in part A2.
  • The consignee details you have given in part A4.
  • The description of the waste you have given in part B3.

The carrier will then fill in their details, sign and put the date and time (using the 24-hour clock) on the note.

1. ‘Carrier name:’, ‘On behalf of (name, address, postcode, telephone, e-mail, facsimile):’

  • The carrier must give their name, the name of their business and all appropriate address and contact details.

2. ‘Carrier registration no./reason for exemption’:

  • A carrier must either be registered or exempt from registration. The carrier must give their registration number if they have one. If the carrier is exempt, they should give the reason for the exemption (for example, a waste producer can transport their own waste without being a registered waste carrier). However, producers of construction and demolition waste must always be registered as a carrier.
  • It is good practice to regularly check that the details the carrier has given are correct. A carrier registration is valid for three years, and the Environment Agency may revoke (cancel) it in certain circumstances. You (the site/ company) can check if the carrier has a valid registration by looking at the online electronic public register on our website or by contacting us on 03708 506 506.
  • The carrier’s registration details must be those of the actual carrier. So, if a subcontractor has been used, the subcontractor’s registration details must be given, not the main contractor’s details.

3. ‘Vehicle registration no. (or mode of transport, if not road):’

  • The carrier must enter the registration number of the vehicle they are using to collect the hazardous waste. If the waste is not being carried by road, the carrier must identify which method of transport they are using (for example, railway, canal barge and so on).

4. Round and collection number: (only for notes forming part of a multiple collection)

  • If this consignment forms part of a multiple collection the carrier will also need to fill in the round number / collection number of Part C. Details of the format for these and the requirements for a multiple collection are given in Section B. If the collection is not part of a multiple collection round do not enter anything in this box.

 

Part D Consignor’s certificate (Consigner Signs)

After they have filled in part C, the carrier should give you the consignment notes back. You, as the consignor, should then sign part D of the note.

There is a declaration in part D. You need to check that you have filled in parts A and B correctly and that the carrier has filled in part C. In part C the carrier writes his carrier registration number – by signing part D, you are declaring that you have checked the carrier is registered.

You are declaring that the waste is packaged and labelled correctly. If you are aware of any particular issues relating to how the waste should be handled, you should tell the carrier about them.

There is also a requirement for anyone who produces, handles or manages hazardous waste that all measures as are reasonable must be taken to apply the waste hierarchy when waste is transferred. Unless there is a justifiable reason not to, a waste should be managed in order of preference by:

  • Prevention;
  • Preparing for re-use;
  • Recycling;
  • Other recovery (for example energy recovery);
  • Disposal.

You will need to sign a declaration in Part D to say that you have made these considerations.

Note: You should not fill in part D before the carrier has arrived to collect the waste and has given you copies of the consignment note, with part C filled in, for you to check

 

1. ‘Consignor name:’, ‘On behalf of (name, address, postcode, telephone, e-mail, facsimile):’

  • You must give your name, the name of your business and all appropriate address and contact details. If these are the same as in part A2, you can write ‘As A2’.
  • When you have checked and filled in the details above, you should sign part D. You can then enter the date and time (using the 24-hour clock) that you signed the form.
  • What happens next?
  • Now you have filled in part D, take the top copy (labelled ‘Consignor’s copy’). This is your copy, which you must keep for three years. For details about keeping consignment notes and registers, see HWR05 – ‘Record Keeping’.
  • Give the other two copies of the consignment note to the carrier. The carrier must keep these copies with them when they take the load to its destination.
  • When the carrier takes hazardous waste from your site, they should take it directly to the consignee listed in part A4. They must not take the waste to a consignee that is different to the one you listed in part A. The carrier or consignee are not allowed to amend part A or B once the waste leaves your site, except in emergency situations.
  • When the carrier arrives at the consignee’s site, they will give the consignee the consignment notes to fill in. When the consignee accepts the load, they will fill in part E, keep a copy for themselves and give one to the carrier to keep.
  • The only time when you will be involved in the process again, other than for making sure the consignee holds a waste permit, is if the consignee rejects the load. If this happens, your carrier will contact you to find out what you want to happen to your hazardous waste. It can be delivered to another consignee’s site or you might want to take it back at your site. Hopefully this will not happen but if you need to check what to do in this case, please look at Section F – Rejected loads
  • Within a set period of time (no later than four months after the waste left your site), your consignee must send you a document, called the ‘Consignee’s Return to a Producer or Holder’, to show that they have received hazardous waste from you. The consignee should tell you what they have done with your waste (for example, treated it, taken it to a landfill, transferred it and so on) or if the waste is still in storage awaiting treatment what they intend to do with it. If subsequently a different waste operation is actually carried out the consignee should inform you of the change. You should check that the consignee has properly received and managed all of the loads of waste sent out of your site by matching the return the consignee gives you with the consignment notes in your register. If the consignee does not send you a return, contact them and ask for one. You will need a return if we audit your premises. You can find details of the return in HWR05 – ‘Record Keeping’.

 

What changes can be made to the information on a consignment note?

The law states:

  • who is responsible for filling in each part of a consignment note;
  • when and in what order the parts must be filled in;
  • the parts of the note that must be filled in before the waste is removed cannot be changed after the waste has been removed;
  • a part of the consignment note cannot be changed, other than by the person who is allowed to fill in that part or by someone who is authorised by them to make the amendment. For example, only the producer or holder of the waste can amend part A of the consignment note, and they can only make this amendment before the waste is removed. If they amend part A after the carrier checked the note by filling in part C, the carrier must check the note again before they remove the waste.
  • if the carrier or consignor has checked and signed the relevant part of the note, that part cannot be changed.
  • Consignees who receive waste on consignment notes that have been changed should reject the waste, unless it is clear from the note that:
  • the change has been made, or authorised, by the person responsible for filling in that part of the note;
  • the change was made before the carrier or consignor checked it;
  • the change was made before the waste was removed.

 

Notes on Carriage details

‘UN identification number(s)’, ‘Proper shipping name(s)’, ‘UN Classes(es)’, ‘Packing groups(s)’ and ‘Special handling requirements’

The consignment note must give these details if the waste is also ‘dangerous for carriage’. It is the responsibility of the business which transports dangerous goods either on its own behalf or for someone else. If the waste is transported under a contract for carriage the responsibility would lie with the consignor set out in the contract. Please note the meaning of the term consignor maybe different to that used for the Hazardous Waste Regulations. More information on carriage of dangerous goods can be found on the Health and Safety Executives’ website http://www.hse.gov.uk/cdg/manual/index.htm.

 

Hazardous properties

H1 “Explosive”: substances and preparations which may explode under the effect of flame or which are more sensitive to shocks or friction than dinitrobenzene.

H2 “Oxidizing”: substances and preparations which exhibit highly exothermic reactions when in contact with other substances, particularly flammable substances.

H3A “Highly flammable”

- liquid substances and preparations having a flash point below 21°C (including extremely flammable liquids), or

- substances and preparations which may become hot and finally catch fire in contact with air at ambient temperature without any application of energy, or

- solid substances and preparations which may readily catch fire after brief contact with a source of ignition and which continue to burn or be consumed after removal of the source of ignition, or

- gaseous substances and preparations which are flammable in air at normal pressure, or

- substances and preparations which, in contact with water or damp air, evolve highly flammable gases in dangerous quantities.

H3B “Flammable”: liquid substances and preparations having a flash point equal to or greater than 21°C and less than or equal to 55°C.

H4 “Irritant”: non-corrosive substances and preparations which, through immediate, prolonged or repeated contact with the skin or mucous membrane, can cause inflammation.

H5 “Harmful”: substances and preparations which, if they are inhaled or ingested or if they penetrate the skin, may involve limited health risks.

H6 “Toxic”: substances and preparations (including very toxic substances and preparations) which, if they are inhaled or ingested or if they penetrate the skin, may involve serious, acute or chronic health risks and even death.

H7 “Carcinogenic”: substances and preparations which, if they are inhaled or ingested or if they penetrate the skin, may induce cancer or increase its incidence.

H8 “Corrosive”: substances and preparations which may destroy living tissue on contact.

H9 “Infectious”: substances and preparations containing viable micro-organisms or their toxins which are known or reliably believed to cause disease in man or other living organisms.

H10 “Toxic for reproduction”: substances and preparations which, if they are inhaled or ingested or if they penetrate the skin, may induce non-hereditary congenital malformations or increase their incidence.

H11 “Mutagenic”: substances and preparations which, if they are inhaled or ingested or if they penetrate the skin, may induce hereditary genetic defects or increase their incidence.

H12 Waste which releases toxic or very toxic gases in contact with water, air or an acid.

H13 “Sensitizing”: substances and preparations which, if they are inhaled or if they penetrate the skin, are capable of eliciting a reaction of hypersensitization such that on further exposure to the substance or preparation, characteristic adverse effects are produced. [As far as testing methods are available].

H14 “Ecotoxic”: waste which presents or may present immediate or delayed risks for one or more sectors of the environment.

H15 Waste capable by any means, after disposal, of yielding another substance, e.g. a leachate, which possesses any of the characteristics above.

 

Section F – Rejected Loads

Sometimes a consignee will reject hazardous waste when it is delivered to their site. This part of the guide informs:

  • consignees what to do if they need to reject hazardous waste;
  • carriers what action to take if waste they are carrying is rejected;
  • consignors, holders or producers what their options are when their carrier contacts them about the rejection.

This guide applies to the rejection of waste at a consignee site, for the purposes of the Hazardous Waste Regulations (HWR), at the time of completion of the consignee’s part of the consignment note. After a consignee signs a consignment note to accept a waste at their site this guidance does not apply. If, after accepting the waste, the consignee subsequently decides to reject the waste they must not use the Hazardous Waste rejection procedures in this guide. In this situation, to remove the hazardous waste from their site, they must consign it as a new consignment using the normal procedures for consigning hazardous waste to a site that holds a suitable authorisation in accordance with the Environmental Permitting Regulations.

Why is waste rejected?

Consignees do not often reject hazardous waste but it can happen. They might reject the waste for the following reasons.

  • An unplanned breakdown in the machinery and equipment at the consignee’s site.
  • The equipment or machinery at a consignee’s site might break down for a long period, forcing the consignee to reject the waste. It will not always be necessary for the consignee to reject the waste, as they will often have emergency plans in place.

Planned closures

  • If a consignee plans to shut down machinery or equipment for maintenance work and doing so would affect their ability to receive waste, they should tell their customers. The consignee would not need to reject waste for this reason but there will be times when this might happen.

Weather conditions

  • High winds or heavy rain can cause sites (especially landfills) to close temporarily.

Hazardous waste arriving at a consignee’s site without a consignment note

  • Except in certain specific circumstances (Page 5 for details), producers or holders must fill in a consignment note for all hazardous waste moved from their premises. If waste arrives at a consignee’s site without a consignment note, and a consignment note is needed, the consignee must reject it.

Consignment problems

  • A producer or holder must properly describe their waste on a consignment note. If the description is wrong or the waste collected does not match that described on the note, the consignee should reject the load. Carriers must not change a consignment note once they have collected the waste. If consignees suspect that the carrier has amended the consignment note without the producer or holder knowing, they must check the details with the producer or holder. If the details are not correct, they should reject the load.

If waste is not allowed under the consignee’s permit, exemption or other authorisation

  • Consignees may hold a permit to accept waste, may be exempt from holding a permit or covered by a modern waste regulatory position for example. A permit sets out the types and quantities (weights) of waste that the consignee can accept. If the consignee is exempt from holding a permit or covered by another authorisation, they have special conditions to follow. If the site is not allowed to accept the waste because of the conditions of the consignee’s permit, for example, they must reject any load that does not keep to the restrictions. This means a site that is only permitted to accept non-hazardous waste must reject hazardous waste that is delivered to it.

A site that has restrictions on the types of hazardous waste it can accept must only accept those types of waste. Some sites may be restricted from taking waste with certain hazardous properties (for example, explosive types of waste may be excluded in the permit). Some sites may be restricted to taking waste with less than set amounts of dangerous substances (for example, threshold levels of oils may be restricted).

I am a consignee. What do I have to do if I reject waste?

If you are given copies of consignment notes, you must do the following:

  • on all the copies you have received, say in part E of the consignment note, that you do not accept all or part of the consignment. Under the heading ‘Where waste is rejected, please provide details below’, you must give your reason for rejecting the waste;
  • keep one copy of the note;
  • give one copy to the carrier;
  • send a copy to the consignor as soon as possible. You must also send a copy to the producer or holder as appropriate.

If you are not given copies of consignment notes, you must do the following:

  • Prepare a written explanation, including the following details if you know them.
  • Your reasons for not accepting all or part of the consignment.
  • Details of the waste.
  • Details of the producer, holder or consignor.

A consignment note code for the rejected load. You give the load a code using the following format.

REJECT/XXXYYR, where:

- ‘R’ shows that you have rejected the load;

- ‘XXX’ is letters or numbers to show the original producer’s or holder’s business name;

- ‘YY’ is letters or numbers used to give the rejected load a unique code.

For example, if you reject a load originally produced by a company called A A Aardvark, the consignment note code could be

REJECT/AAA01R or REJECT/AA1G1R.

Keep a copy of your explanation.

Give the carrier a copy of your explanation.

Send the consignor a copy of your explanation as soon as you can. You must also send a copy to the producer or holder as appropriate.

Whenever you reject a consignment of hazardous

Whenever you reject a consignment of hazardous waste, you must record the details of the rejection on your quarterly return ( See our guides HWR04A Hazardous waste consignee returns - sending an electronic return or HWR04C Hazardous waste consignee returns – sending a paper return, that describe how to record such movements). You must do this even if you do not have a permit to receive hazardous waste.

 

I am a carrier. What should I do if the consignee rejects the waste I have delivered?

When the consignee tells you that they are rejecting the load, you should do the following.

  • tell the Environment Agency by phoning 03708 506 506 as soon as possible after the consignment has been rejected, providing the following information:
  • the consignment note code;
  • the consignee’s name and address;
  • the date and time the consignment was rejected
  • the consignee’s explanation for rejecting the waste.

Make arrangements with the original waste producer or holder to transfer the consignment to another consignee, as long as the other consignee is able to accept the waste. You must then make sure that you take all reasonable steps to carry out the producer’s or holder’s instructions. This includes filling in consignment notes for the producer or holder.

I am the producer of the waste. What should I do if the consignee rejects my waste?

The carrier should ring you, as the producer or holder of the waste, to tell you that the consignee has rejected your waste. You should then do the following;

  • make arrangements, as soon as possible, to have the rejected consignment transferred to another consignee. If you cannot find another consignee within five business days, the waste must be returned to you to be stored. The consignee does not have a responsibility to keep any rejected waste on their facility for more than five days before it is removed, so you should consider this to be the maximum time limit for removing the waste. The waste can be returned to you for storage as soon as you have found that there is no other suitable consignee available to accept the waste. You must store any waste returned to you in line with ‘waste directive’ conditions. These conditions say you must not:
    • put people’s health at risk by storing the waste;
    • use processes or methods which could harm the environment, and in particular:
    • put water, air, soil and plants and animals at risk;
    • create noise or smells which cause a nuisance;
    • harm the countryside or places of special interest.
    • tell the carrier where to deliver the consignment;

Tell the Environment Agency what is happening by phoning 03708 506 506.

 

What consignment note should I use for a rejected load?

You must use a consignment note to have that waste removed from your site. If the waste you reject from the original consignment note is to be delivered to other different consignees, you will need a number of consignment notes.

Some types of waste, such as oil, can be mixed together on a vehicle. If you reject this waste, it cannot be delivered back to the original producers. This is because the waste is no longer the same as that which was originally consigned. The waste must be delivered to another consignee.

How is the consignment note filled in?

The original hazardous-waste producer or holder is responsible for making sure that a consignment note is filled in before the waste is:

  • carried to another consignee;
  • returned to the producer’s or holder’s premises.

It is likely that the original producer or holder is not able to fill in the notes themselves because they are not based at the site at which the waste is being rejected. They can ask the carrier to fill in the consignment note for them, but will continue to be responsible for making sure this is done.

The consignor, producer or holder, the carrier and the new consignee will each need a copy of the consignment note.

You should fill in part A of the consignment note as follows.

1 Consignment note code:

If a consignment note code was supplied on the original note and it was in the correct format, you should copy the number into the consignment note code boxes and add an ‘R’ at the end of the number. For example, if the original number was ABF843/WEF01, the new number will be ABF843/WEF01R. If a consignment note was not supplied originally, the following consignment on the new consignment note should be ‘REJECT/XXXYYR’, where:

  • ‘R’ shows that the consignee has rejected the load;
  • ‘XXX’ is letters or numbers showing the producer’s or holder’s business name;
  • ‘YY’ is letters or numbers used to give the rejected load a unique code.

For example, if the consignee rejects a load which was originally produced by a company called A A Aardvark, the consignment note code could be REJECT/AAA01R or

REJECT/AA1G1R.

2 The waste described below is to be removed from (name, address, postcode, telephone, email, facsimile):

These are the details of the consignee who has rejected the waste.

3 Premises code (where applicable):

This is the registration number of the original producer. Enter ‘N/A’ if the original producer’s site was exempt, or ‘REJECT’ if a consignment note was not supplied originally.

4 The waste will be taken to (name, address and postcode):

  • This provides details about the site the hazardous waste is to be delivered to (that is, the new consignee). You need to give full details of the new consignee, and the consignee must either hold a permit to receive the waste, be exempt from holding a permit or covered by another authorisation. If the consignee holds a permit, the name, address and postcode you give here should match the name, address and postcode on the consignee’s permit.

5 The waste producer was (if different from 2) (name, address, postcode, telephone, e-mail, facsimile):

  • These are the details of the original producer or holder. This will be from part A1 on the original consignment note.
  • You should fill in part B of the consignment note as follows.
  • If you are rejecting the whole consignment, you should copy the relevant information from part B of the original consignment note. If you are rejecting only part of the consignment, you only need to copy the details relating to the part of the waste you have rejected.
  • If the consignee has said in their written explanation that the description of the waste was incorrect or missing, you must include a new and accurate description.
  • See Standard procedure for a description of how to correctly fill in section B.

You should fill in parts C, D and E of the note as described in the Standard procedure section However, the following also apply.

In part D, the consignor would normally fill in the note. Because the consignor may not be available to sign the note, the carrier should act on their behalf.

In Part E, if the waste is being delivered to the original producer or holder, they should take the role of the consignee for the purposes of filling in part E, no matter whether or not they hold a permit or registered exemption. So, in the section:

‘I certify that waste permit/exempt waste operation number(s)…... authorises the management of the waste described in B at the address given in A4’, the producer or holder should enter their permit number if they have one.

If they do not hold a permit or exemption, or the exemption is not registered, they should say this here. For example, non waste framework exemption number (NWFE) 2 in Schedule 25 of the Environmental Permitting covers temporary storage of any waste at the place of production before it is collected from the site where it was produced. However, this exemption does not need to be registered and so the producer or holder will not be issued with a reference number. So the consignment note should state NWFE 2.